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Close Reading – The Answers are all in front of you

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Top Ten Tips to Pass Higher English

Enter the Exam Room Confident and Prepared in May

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CLOSE READING – SAY IT, SAY IT AGAIN AND YES, SAY IT AGAIN !

Higher English Close Reading

Close Reading seems to present students a lot of problems. Let’s look in particular at that old bug bear of a question – word choice.

Here’s an extract from an article in The Sunday Herald newspaper, in which Vicky Allan, having described the failure of the ‘five a day’ fruit and veg’ campaign, goes on to criticise a similar new campaign:

Last week, it was proposed that parents should be exhorted to adhere to the following five-a-day childcare check-list; read to your kids for 15 minutes; play on the floor with them for 10; talk to the for 10 minutes; praise them regularly; and give them a nutritious diet.

The problem isn’t the checklist itself, but the “nudge” principle behind the campaign. This politically trendy word litters the report. Governments are becoming overly fond of nudging, manipulating, beguiling and frog-marching us towards the kinds of personal change they say would lead to better health, reduced crime and other grand objectives.

Show how the writer’s word choice in the second paragraph shows her disapproval of the campaign .

Show how the writer’s word choice in the second paragraph shows her disapproval of the campaign .

Captain Obvious here, but we only need to look at the second paragraph and words that show disapproval.

Step one then is to underline or circle the key words of the question – here I’ve made them bold.

Step two is to underline or circle the words that fit this criteria:

The problem isn’t the checklist itself, but the “nudge” principle behind the campaign. This politically trendy word litters the report. Governments are becoming overly fond of nudging, manipulating, beguiling and frog-marching us towards the kinds of personal change they say would lead to better health, reduced crime and other grand objectives.

You could even choose ‘grand’ and ‘they say’ but when there are so many words showing obvious disapproval go for them.

How then do we answer this?:

Write the word you have chosen in inverted commas and then use the word suggest immediately after and then launch into what the word suggests to you, what picture you have in your head. So- 

‘trendy’ suggests something driven by a desire to seem fashionable, something of the moment, lacking substance, won’t last forever.

Can you see there that there are actually 4 different answers to this? This is a Higher  English exam remember and students should be demonstrating that they have a good understanding of English and a good vocabulary to show that. So:

SAY IT, SAY IT AGAIN AND SAY IT AGAIN 

Secure the marks and make the examiner believe from the off that you’re an A candidate.

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Top Ten Tips to Pass Higher English

Enter the Exam Room Confident and Prepared in May

One Step Nearer That Pass